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clipsintro:start_en [2010/01/04 22:09]
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clipsintro:start_en [2011/06/14 03:44] (current)
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   * Fully Documented: CLIPS comes with extensive documentation including a Reference Manual and a User's Guide. ​   * Fully Documented: CLIPS comes with extensive documentation including a Reference Manual and a User's Guide. ​
  
-  * Low Cost: CLIPS is maintained as public domain ​software. ​+  * Low Cost: CLIPS is maintained as open source ​software. ​
  
  
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 Originally, the primary representation methodology in CLIPS was a forward chaining rule language based on the Rete algorithm (hence the Production System part of the CLIPS acronym). Version 5.0 of CLIPS, released in the spring of 1991, introduced two new programming paradigms: procedural programming (as found in languages such as C and Ada;) and object-oriented programming (as found in languages such as the Common Lisp Object System and Smalltalk). The object-oriented programming language provided within CLIPS is called the CLIPS Object-Oriented Language (COOL). Version 5.1 of CLIPS, released in the fall of 1991, was primarily a software maintenance upgrade required to support the newly developed and/or enhanced X Window, MS-DOS, and Macintosh interfaces. Version 6.0, released in the Spring of 1993, added fully integrated object/rule pattern matching and support features for rule-based software engineering. Version 6.1 of CLIPS, released in 1998, removed support for older non-ANSI C Compilers and added support for C++ compilers. Commands to profile the time spent in constructs and user-defined functions were also added. Version 6.2, released in the Spring of 2002, added support for multiple environments into which programs can be loaded and improved Windows XP and MacOS development interfaces. Originally, the primary representation methodology in CLIPS was a forward chaining rule language based on the Rete algorithm (hence the Production System part of the CLIPS acronym). Version 5.0 of CLIPS, released in the spring of 1991, introduced two new programming paradigms: procedural programming (as found in languages such as C and Ada;) and object-oriented programming (as found in languages such as the Common Lisp Object System and Smalltalk). The object-oriented programming language provided within CLIPS is called the CLIPS Object-Oriented Language (COOL). Version 5.1 of CLIPS, released in the fall of 1991, was primarily a software maintenance upgrade required to support the newly developed and/or enhanced X Window, MS-DOS, and Macintosh interfaces. Version 6.0, released in the Spring of 1993, added fully integrated object/rule pattern matching and support features for rule-based software engineering. Version 6.1 of CLIPS, released in 1998, removed support for older non-ANSI C Compilers and added support for C++ compilers. Commands to profile the time spent in constructs and user-defined functions were also added. Version 6.2, released in the Spring of 2002, added support for multiple environments into which programs can be loaded and improved Windows XP and MacOS development interfaces.
  
-CLIPS is now maintained independently from NASA as public domain ​software.+CLIPS is now maintained independently from NASA as open source ​software.
  
 Because of its portability,​ extensibility,​ capabilities,​ and low-cost, CLIPS has received widespread acceptance throughout the government, industry, and academia. The development of CLIPS has helped to improve the ability to deliver expert system technology throughout the public and private sectors for a wide range of applications and diverse computing environments. Because of its portability,​ extensibility,​ capabilities,​ and low-cost, CLIPS has received widespread acceptance throughout the government, industry, and academia. The development of CLIPS has helped to improve the ability to deliver expert system technology throughout the public and private sectors for a wide range of applications and diverse computing environments.
 
 
clipsintro/start_en.txt ยท Last modified: 2011/06/14 03:44 by admin
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